Why does my puppy get hiccups?

“Why does my puppy get hiccups?”, this question, although a little stranger than others, is a normal response question. “Why does my puppy get hiccups?”, because he or she is a living, breathing, animal.

Your puppy like any other animal in the world, including humans, can and will get hiccups. Have you ever experienced or heard of a baby in utero getting hiccups? If not, rest assured, it does happen. A little strange, but it happens non-the less.

Your puppy will get hiccups if he or she takes in too much air when drinking or eating. Or just randomly at times because they’re breathing creatures.

“Why does my puppy get hiccups?”, If you’re looking for an issue or more scientific reasoning, I’m sorry to say I can’t give you one. This is really a very straight forward answer.

How do you help your puppy get rid of hiccups? Just like with people, you can scare them, sort of funny, not funny, kind of really funny. Or you can just leave them be and let them go away on their own.

There is no rhyme or reason behind “Why does my puppy get hiccups?”. It can occur at any point in time throughout the day or night. Same with age. It can occur when they are young puppies or older adult dogs. Either way it’s perfectly normal, and sometimes down right adorable to watch.

Rest assured, the hiccups will eventually go away. They do not last forever. If you feel there is a medical reason behind this than video it and contact your vet. When you video it, you’ll be able to show your vet what’s going on instead of trying and failing to explain it to him.

Sometimes we also confuse a reverse sneeze with hiccups. Reverse sneezes are sort of like a snort. They occur maybe 2 or 3 in a row and then from there disappear until the next time. This is similar to the way some people hold in their sneezes compared to others who sneeze very loud and very absurdly, you know who you are, that giant “AHHHH CHOOOOO”. Unnecessary, but to each their own.

So again, “Why does my puppy get hiccups?”, simple, because he or she is a living breathing animal. And it’s ok! It’s also ok to worry. But if you feel better about asking your vet, videoing the event will definitely make it easier to understand or portray to the vet. We’d also love to see it! So if you have video’s on hand, send them our way!